Author Archives: traditionalfencing

Some (not so profound) thoughts on I.33, anticipating Forgeng’s new edition

In a few weeks, Jeffrey Forgeng’s new edition and translation of Royal Armouries MS I.33 is slated to be released, published by the Royal Armouries directly.   I’m super excited about it, and my copy is already on order — … Continue reading

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Longpoint: the nucleus of the art

The anonymous author[s] of MS I.33, the Walpurgis Fechtbuch, tell us this about the seventh ward, langort (longpoint): Note that the nucleus of the entire art of fencing consists in this last ward, called langort; all actions of the sword … Continue reading

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“Controlling the Center:” advice from Musashi, not Marozzo

What happens when we frame European swordsmanship techniques on an Asian martial theoretical framework?  Well, you get a hybrid system.  Not that there’s anything necessarily wrong with a hybrid system – the proponents of the northern Italian “scuola mista” style … Continue reading

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Coming to Grips, Medieval Style, Part II

How were medieval swords held? Continue reading

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Coming to Grips, Medieval Style

How were bucklers held, historically, and how should this inform their use today? Grip is fundamental to proper use of a sword, buckler, or any hand weapon.  To use the weapon right – and to have any hope of using … Continue reading

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New Book: Irish Fencing in the 1700’s!

If you are at all interested in the history of fencing, let alone the Emerald Isle, you need to check out Irish Swordsmanship: Fencing and Dueling in Eighteenth Century Ireland, by Ben Miller, just released after ten years of exhaustive … Continue reading

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The value of classical fencing in historical fencing interpretation

 The contents of this post reflect my own views and opinions, and do not necessarily represent those of my masters at Martinez Academy of Arms.  Any errors are fully my own, as I am still in training and have been … Continue reading

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